home Broadband, Cyber Security, Governance The FCC Receives in excess of 3 Million Comments on Net Neutrality

The FCC Receives in excess of 3 Million Comments on Net Neutrality

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The FCC has received more than 3 million comments concerning the current net neutrality notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). That figure is dramatically higher than the previously reported 1.5 million figure that was released last week.
 
The massive jump comes from the FCC chewing through a deluge of comments that were filed last week as part of a public campaign that saw large websites ask their users to speak up on net neutrality. The FCC created a new way for groups to submit bulk comments in the face of the effort, to better handle the quantity of submissions it was receiving.
 
Today is the last day to comment, in case you have yet to file your views with the government. Comments will be accepted up until 11:59 PM, Eastern Time this evening.
 
That net neutrality could drive 1 million comments was surprising to many. Net neutrality is arcane, technical, and difficult to explain to the uninformed. Sustained public campaign overcame those speed bumps, it seems.
 
Comments submitted to the FCC have been largely slanted in favor of net neutrality.

There is slight tension among net neutrality advocates concerning which set of legal rules should be used to support an open Internet — CalInnovates thinks that using Title II is a bad plan, for example — even as the majority opinion seems to have set around Title II, over Section 706.

3 million comments deep, the public has said its piece. What the FCC will do with the collected public opinion isn’t clear.
 

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Brent Donald

This is my collection of some of the things I find interesting from art, design, internet culture, technology and advertising and scoops I get from colleagues and my searches. Internet technology is one of the best technologies that we have been afforded to utilize accordingly.

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